Riesling vs. Rosé: The Untold Similarities, Differences & Selection Criteria

It may seem to many that Riesling and Rosé are the same, considering the sweetness, color, and how many who enjoy Rosé will also enjoy the parent grape wine of Riesling, Gouais Blanc. 

So let’s talk about this comparison and get to know our wines a little better before deciding how close they might be or not.

 

Is Riesling The Same As Rosé?

Riesling is not the same as Rosé. However, that’s not what those in the wine community might think. Aside from their many strong differences, there are a few similarities. So let’s get into the specifics! 

 

What Is Similar About Riesling and Rosé?

Although Riesling and Rosé are two different wines made with different grapes, curiosity sparks in how similar they are. 

However, the two wines are both considered to be paired by those who enjoy them, meaning if you like Rosé, you’ll enjoy Riesling and vice versa. Generally speaking, Rosé and Riesling and Rosé contain the same amount of alcohol content.

They both also pair with almost every red meat cut out there, such as steak. 

 

What Is The Difference between Riesling and Rosé?

There are a few very distinctive differences between Riesling and Rosé, mainly concluding the basics like color, notes, and even the grapes that create the wines. 

Rosé is a pink wine variety created from an array of different red wine grapes, with a few being grapes like Mourvèdre, Pinot Noir, and Sangiovese. Rosé also carries notes of strawberry, rose petal, rhubarb, and more, which differs from a Riesling.

Riesling is a white wine with specifically identified parent grapes such as Gouais Blanc, and the other being a descendent of Savagnin. 

Although Riesling can be created in various styles, the main notes of the wine can include the basics of lime, green apple, and petroleum. As you might find, there are strong differences between the two wines. 

 

Which One Is Sweeter Or Drier Than The Other?

When determining which wine is sweeter, it’s important to keep in mind that both Rosé and Riesling can be created into sweet or dry wines. 

Considering how versatile Rosé can be when it’s made, the sweetness greatly varies. This makes things slightly difficult when it comes to comparing the sweetness of Riesling and Rosé. 

If you’re in search of a sweeter Rosé, look for a Pink Moscato. If you prefer a dry Rosé that’s not sweet, look for a Rosé made with Pinot Noir or Mourvèdre. 

The same applies to Riesling. The wine can be created into both sweet or dry beverages. 

Overall speaking, Riesling, in general, is said to be on the sweeter side due to its basic flavors of lime and lemon – meaning not the sweetest wine, but slightly according to Wine Folly. 

 

Which One Has More Alcohol Content?

Riesling has an average of 12% alcohol compared to its volume, while Rosé also carries the same average of 12% alcohol content compared to volume. So it’s safe to say both Riesling and Rosé usually contain the same amount of alcohol. 

 

How Do I Choose Between Riesling And Rosé?

This depends on the notes and flavors you prefer. If you enjoy a wine with notes like strawberry, rosé petal, and rhubarb – you will enjoy a rosé. 

If you’d prefer a white wine with baseline lime and green apple notes, you’ll prefer a Riesling over a Rosé. Ultimately the best thing you can do is to just give them both a try to decide for yourself. 

 

Final Thoughts on Riesling vs. Rosé

Although not considered the same, Rosé and Riesling carry the same alcohol content and pair with the same cuisines, such as red meats. 

What makes these wines different is their notes and the grapes used to create these wines. There’s no saying which wine is sweeter than the other because both of these wines can be created into dry or sweet wines, which means that this can vary.