This Description Of Moscato Will Reveal The Allure Of This Wine

There’s nothing better than finding a new wine to cozy up with. As people rush to grab the common names they’re used to, like pinot noir or chardonnay, why not try something new?

After all, discovering your new favorite variety can be the most exciting part of drinking wine! Although Moscato doesn’t appear on every wine list or dinner table, it’s one of the most approachable and refreshing wines out there. 

How would you describe Moscato?

There’s nothing new about Moscato. The Mediterranean grape varieties it’s named after have been around for thousands of years. It’s commonly believed that the ancient Greeks and Romans brought the grape to France, and from there, it spread throughout the globe.

Dozens of grapes are members of the Moscato family, and they may be the first wine grapes ever grown. Moscato is rarely expensive and continues to win over wine drinkers with its delicious and refreshing qualities. 

What does Moscato look like?

Moscato, or Muscat Blanc, as it’s sometimes known, is a white grape. The wine is often light in color, similar to a riesling. When put side by side with chardonnay, Moscato is much lighter in color. In Italy, where it is a popular table wine, there are several less common variations like pink, rose, and even dark ruby.

Rose Moscatos often get their color from the addition of red wine like Merlot. Just a small amount turns the white wine into a light pink and adds red berry flavors. Red Moscato is a genetic cross between Moscato and an Italian red grape. Regardless of these novelties, the vast majority of Moscatos have a color similar to light straw. 

What does Moscato smell like?

What Moscato lacks in color, it makes up for in its fruity and floral aromas. Many drinkers say it smells like orange blossoms and honeysuckle with a hint of lemon. Other common aromas include pear and orange. The smell of Moscato is one reason it’s become so popular.

In the summer, few wines compare to the refreshing smells of citrus and flower pedals that come out of a glass of Moscato. A fun fact about the food and drinks we love is that most of what we taste is what we smell. Because of these pleasant aromas, tasting Moscato is like a journey into the garden on a summer day. 

What does Moscato taste like?

Tasting Moscato can be one of the most enjoyable experiences in wine. An overwhelming surge of peach, lemon, and honeysuckle fragrance meets your tongue as you taste the wine. One characteristic of Moscato is its low alcohol content. As a result, some wines can contain half the amount of other typical white wines.

Another quality is the lack of tartness to the wine, especially when compared to other white wines like Sauvignon Blanc and riesling. This makes Moscato the perfect companion for foods that use a lot of spice, vinegar, and citrus. So, if you’re wondering what wine to order at your favorite Chinese or Thai restaurant, Moscato is a good choice.

How sweet or dry is Moscato?

Moscato is generally sweet but sometimes dry. In Italy, where warm and sunny weather, the grapes have time to ripen into sweet, flavorful berries. In colder climates, like Germany or Eastern France, grapes have less time to ripen on the vine. For Moscatos from these regions, this results in drier, crisper wines. Dry Moscato is very hard to find in most places outside of Europe.

Most Moscatos sold in stores are on the sweeter side, and this, combined with their lower alcohol content and delicious taste, makes them perfect for people who want to relax and enjoy something flavorful yet light. Some Moscatos are so sweet that they are considered dessert wines. A little sweet Moscato poured onto vanilla ice cream can change your world!

Final Thoughts on Moscato’s description

For people who like wine on the lighter, sweeter end and want something affordable and delicious, Moscato is a perfect choice. Its aromas of rose petal and lemon zest and flavors of sweet pear, apricot, and peach make a delicious companion to spicy and sour foods.

No matter what style you want, from dry to sweet, fizzy to still, Moscato wines are sure to satisfy.